By Lebossé C., Hémery C.

Desk des matières :

Livre I. — Calcul algébrique

Première leçon. — Nombres algébriques
    Addition des nombres algébriques
    Soustraction
    Sommes algébriques
    Multiplication
    Division
    Propriétés des rapports
Deuxième leçon. — Puissances. Racines d’un nombre arithmétique. Racines d’un nombre algébrique
Troisième leçon. — Égalités. Rapports égaux. Proportions. Inégalités
Quatrième leçon. — Vecteurs. Relation de Chasles
Cinquième leçon. — Expressions algébriques. Monômes. Polynômes
Sixième leçon. — Multiplication des monômes et des polynômes. Identités remarquables
Septième leçon. — department des monômes et des polynômes. Identités remarquables
Huitième leçon. — Fractions rationnelles. Expressions irrationnelles

Livre II. — Le most desirable degré

Neuvième leçon. — Équation du most appropriate degré à une inconnue
Dixième leçon. — Équations se ramenant au optimal degré. *Équations irrationnelles
Onzième leçon. — Inéquation du premiere degré à une inconnue
Douzième leçon. — Signe du binôme du ultimate degré. *Applications aux inéquations
Treizième lecon. — Systèmes d’équations du most efficient degré à deux inconnues
    I. Élimination par substitution
    II. Élimination par addition
Quatorzième leçon. — *Systèmes d’équations du most well known degré (suite)
Quinzième leçon. — Systèmes d’équations à plusieurs inconnues
    Systèmes particuliers
Seizième leçon. — Problèmes du ultimate degré

Livre III. — Les fonctions

Dix-septième leçon. — Généralités sur les fonctions. Coordonnées et graphiques
Dix-huitième leçon. — Étude de l. a. fonction : y = ax
Dix-neuvième leçon. — Étude de l. a. fonction : y = ax + b
Vingtième leçon. — functions de los angeles fonction linéaire
Vingt et unième leçon. — Étude de los angeles fonction : y = ax²
Vingt-deuxième leçon. — Étude de l. a. fonction : y = 1/x
Vingt-troisième leçon. — Étude de l. a. fonction : y = a/x

Livre IV. — Le moment degré

Vingt-quatrième lecon. — Équation du moment degré
Vingt-cinquième leçon. — *Relations entre les coefficients et les racines
Vingt-sixième leçon. — *Signe des racines
Vingt-septième leçon. — *Équations et systèmes se ramenant au moment degré
Vingt-huitième leçon. — *Trinôme du moment degré
Vingt-neuvième leçon. — *Inéquations du moment degré. Applications
Trentième leçon. — Problèmes du moment degré

Show description

Read or Download Algèbre : Classe de Seconde des Lycées et Collèges. Programme 1947 PDF

Best elementary books

Frontiers in number theory, physics, and geometry I

This ebook provides pedagogical contributions on chosen issues concerning quantity concept, Theoretical Physics and Geometry. The components are composed of lengthy self-contained pedagogical lectures via shorter contributions on particular topics equipped through subject. so much classes and brief contributions cross as much as the new advancements within the fields; a few of them keep on with their writer?

Italy For Dummies, 5th Edition (Dummies Travel)

For Dummies shuttle publications are the final word elementary journey planners, combining the large allure and time-tested good points of the For Dummies sequence with up to the moment suggestion and knowledge from the specialists at Frommer’s. Small trim measurement to be used on-the-goFocused insurance of merely the simplest motels and eating places in all cost rangesTear-out “cheat sheet” with full-color maps or effortless reference guidelines

Extra info for Algèbre : Classe de Seconde des Lycées et Collèges. Programme 1947

Sample text

But since i − j < pk , the larger prime can not divide it, so it must divide the product p1 p2 · · · pk−1 , but these are all smaller primes, another contradiction. Therefore, a prime larger than pk can divide at most one of these numbers. b. Since there are n−k +1 primes from pk up to pn , and each one can divide at most one of the pk numbers p1 p2 · · · pk−1 i − 1, there must be at least one of the numbers which is not divisible by any prime from pk up to pn . ) From part (a), the primes less than pk also do not divide any of the the numbers, in particular, the one whose existence we have just shown.

Thus, d = −1 + b − c. Now, we see that c is either a − d or 10 + d − a. If c = a − d, then d = −1 + b − c = −1 + b − a + d. From this, we arrive at a + 1 = b, a contradiction. Thus c = 10 + d − 1. If a = a − d, then d = 0. Proceeding along with thought, b = c + 1 = 9 + c − b now, which tells us that b = 8, c = 7 and a = 4. This is a contradiction. Thus a = 9 + c − b and b = a − d. We now have four equations in four unknowns. Solving this system, we find that a = 7, b = 6, c = 4, and d = 1. This gives a fixed point, namely 6174.

B. The smallest prime between 5 and 10 is 7. c. The smallest prime between 19 and 38 is 23. d. The smallest prime between 31 and 62 is 37. 7. a. The smallest prime between 4 and 8 is 5. b. The smallest prime between 6 and 12 is 7. c. The smallest prime between 23 and 46 is 29. d. The smallest prime between 47 and 94 is 53. To see that the primes are indeed in the range, we print them as triples (n2 , smallest prime, (n + 1)2 ). For n = 1, 2, . . , 10 we have (1, 2, 4), (4, 5, 9), (9, 11, 16), (16, 17, 25), (25, 29, 36), (36, 37, 49), (49, 53, 64), (64, 67, 81), (81, 83, 100), and (100, 101, 121).

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.17 of 5 – based on 23 votes