By Ronald W. Sousa;Joel Weinsheimer

Disturbed through acrimonious arguments in regards to the price of humanistic schooling, the authors-former colleagues and university-press board members-embarked on an bold venture to reexamine a couple of significant literary and philosophical works facing the liberal arts and schooling. With their discussions starting from Plat to Rousseau, from Cicero to Vico, from Erasmus to Matthew Arnold, Sousa and Weinsheimer supply no longer a background of schooling philosophy yet an exam of the current. They learn those astonishingly different works with one query most excellent: "Do our predecessors' reflections supply whatever higher in safeguard of humanities schooling than smooth platitudes approximately broadening one's horizons?"

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The humanities in dispute: a dialogue in letters

Disturbed by means of acrimonious arguments in regards to the price of humanistic schooling, the authors-former colleagues and university-press board members-embarked on an formidable venture to reexamine a few significant literary and philosophical works facing the liberal arts and schooling. With their discussions starting from Plat to Rousseau, from Cicero to Vico, from Erasmus to Matthew Arnold, Sousa and Weinsheimer supply no longer a background of schooling philosophy yet an exam of the current.

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I don't see the claim to victimization in my exposition. "Victim" Page 14 is usually a term that refers to an individual, when what I observe is that "I" don't even control the terms of my naming. While I have not given a great deal of thought to it, it seems to me that to observe that one is written elsewhere can be read as a claim of victimization only if it is decided that the argument is being made to vindicate some (greater) degree of autonomous subjecthood. The script of that claim is once again yours, my friend, not mine.

Some feminist projects have made notable departures from this norm, and scholars frequently enough get reviews and other responses to their work, of course; but it is still almost unheard of to carry the conversation even one step further to the point of rejoinder. Collaborative projects, too, are rare; but this book is intended to differ even from them in being written dialogically, not collaboratively. That means it will not be one book, exactly, with one integrated voice, though two authors; nor two books about the same subject, accidentally shuffled and bound together.

The long dialogue is staged as an exchange among Socrates (who had been dead for some years before the date of the dialogue's composition) and several interlocutors, primarily Glaucon and Adimantus (historically Plato's older brothers). The exchange is woven around a challenge of sorts in which the other Page 20 interlocutors urge Socrates to prove his contention that a just man is a happy man and, conversely, an unjust man, no matter how much he may feign other attitudes and profit from public belief in his pretense, is unhappy.

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